Spider-Man: Far From Home (AU - M/UK - 12A/US - PG-13)

In a Word: Kinetic

 Spider Man Far From Home

All the action, intrigue, romance and humour serve to tell a cautionary tale, showing us that our fears are a dangerous illusion and that running away from responsibility is never the answer. With such a worthy theme, Spider-Man: Far From Home delivers a potent message that we can all carry close to our hearts.

After the earth-changing events of Avengers: Endgame, any follow up has some very big boots to fill. Swinging in to meet the challenge is Spider-Man: Far From Home with all the wit, determination and heart this amazing hero can muster.

In a world mourning the loss of the heroes of Endgame and adjusting to the sudden reappearance of half the population, Far From Home explores the impact of this new world through the eyes of the students of Midtown High School as they embark on a two week field trip through Europe. Hoping to escape the spotlight that comes with being a hero, Peter Parker (Tom Holland) eagerly wants to use this time to express his feelings for MJ (Zendaya) against the backdrop of the romantic locations of Venice, Paris, Prague and London. 

Peter’s plans are derailed by Nick Fury (Samuel L Jackson) who recruits him to team up with new hero, Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal), in a desperate attempt to save the world from violent Elementals that have already destroyed Mysterio’s planet. The result is a story that is equal parts road trip, romance, comedy, mystery and coming-of-age with a healthy serving of Spiderman’s kinetic action. 

There is all the death-defying, amazing acrobatics and landmark destroying destruction that are now expected in this genre. However, what really gives the film charm are the stories of young love interwoven with the action. Parker’s best friend Ned Leeds (Jacob Batalon) stars in a saccharine sub-plot with Betty Brant (Angourie Rice) while Peter’s awkward courtship of MJ gets complicated with competition from the hunky Brad Davis (Remy Hii). Even Aunt May (Marissa Tomei) and Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau) flirt furiously, reinforcing the romantic comedy overtones. 

The comedy and romance is balanced with plenty of intrigue and to keep audiences guessing. But at the heart of it all is Peter Parker’s journey of self-discovery. In contrast to Spider-Man: Homecoming, where Peter yearned for greater responsibilities, Far From Home shows a Spiderman struggling to deal with the loss of his mentor and running away from the obligations of being a hero. His youth, fears and failures create feelings of unworthiness and Parker must overcome his insecurities first before defeating his enemies.

All the action, intrigue, romance and humour serve to tell a cautionary tale, showing us that our fears are a dangerous illusion and that running away from responsibility is never the answer. With such a worthy theme, Spider-Man: Far From Home delivers a potent message that we can all carry close to our hearts.