Google has been taking instruction in how to speak like an Aussie. The company announced late last month that it had updated the local version of its app so that it would answer in an Australian accent when asked questions and or when giving directions in Google Maps. Not only that, it's also had its vocab updated so it can correctly pronounce some of those tough Australian place names like a local as well us understand some unique features of the Australian lexicon meaning it now knows what you're saying when you ask where the nearest servo, Maccas or Woolies is as well as words like 'arvo' and 'footy'.

Ever seen a number this big: 10,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000? The numeral represents 10 unquadragintilliard, a figure, which according to scientists at the University of Cambridge in the UK, represents the number of ways in which 128 tennis balls can be arranged in a box (a figure higher than the total number of particles in the universe). The calculation, made using a complex computer program, will hopefully help with the prediction of the movement of avalanches.

A photograph depicting an Irish potato has sold for €1 million, according to reports. The work, by Irish photographer Kevin Abosch, was bought by an anonymous European businessman.

Meanwhile, in the wake of last week's story about a church in Taiwan shaped like a glass slipper, we decided to take a look at some other unusual churches. Among them is what may be the world's smallest church - Cross Island Chapel in Oneida, New York - which, like the glass slipper church, is primarily used for weddings. Accessible only by boat, it only has room for the bride, groom and minister. We'll look at another one next week!