Kim Jong-un has only been in leadership of North Korea for a little over a year – and his ascension to power wasn’t immediate as many considered him too young and inexperienced for the role. Now the world’s youngest head of state seems to be trying to flex his muscle and prove to his own people, if not the world, that he can live up to the cult of personality that surrounds being the supreme leader of North Korea.

Are his recent threats all bluff and bluster to bolster his leadership credentials, and get a heap of hits on YouTube? Or do they represent a clear and present danger to world peace?

"Having grown up during the cold war – when the imminent threat of thermonuclear war saw me going to sleep in a cold sweat on not a few nights – such rhetoric brings back bad memories. These are memories I don't want my own children to have to grow up with."

Having grown up during the cold war – when the imminent threat of thermonuclear war saw me going to sleep in a cold sweat on not a few nights – such rhetoric brings back bad memories. These are memories I don't want my own children to have to grow up with.

How should the rest of the world react to such bluster? Should we flex our own muscles to put Jong-un in his place, or will such reactions just unnecessarily escalate this situation? In the shadow of Easter, does the message of Christ - a message we have long seen as bringing peace - teach us how to respond to such world events? I think it does.

Firstly, let’s remember that the conflicted Korean Peninsula is of our own making. The Allies in victory after World War II carved up this country without consulting the people. We continue to live with the fall out.  

For the South, it has been a boom, the influence of Christianity surely a key factor. Just as an example, in less than 100 years South Korea has gone from a country where agencies like Compassion and World Vision sponsored thousands of children, to now South Koreans sponsoring thousands of children across the rest of the world. Its success is remarkable.

In the North, life has not been so nice! Unfortunately the closed nature of the country means that we don’t know the half of it, but the people have been subject to famine and strict militarisation. 

But what to do with Kim Jong-un’s bluster? I’m wondering if such posturing isn’t just an effort to sure up local support for his leadership and boost the morale of his people. I’m wondering if this isn't the last growl of a wounded tiger? Are we witnessing a lame beast bellowing out in a last attempt to scare away its enemies, and trying to drive away the inevitable? Is this country as internally secure and stable as we are lead to believe?

As we have experienced the Arab Spring, could there be an 'Asia Summer' about to unexpectedly descend upon the North? Regardless of what is going on, how should we react?

The rest of the world needs to show restraint; to turn the other cheek. As Jong-un throws insults and threats our way, the worst thing we could do is give him reason to follow through. What terrifies me is not the threats of a largely impotent rogue state, but the positioning of a militarily mighty West, that could over-react.  Like a staffroom argument that goes from teasing to tasers because no-one will swallow their pride and back down, we must not be provoked by the little man to take a big swing. We will be the ones who come out with egg on our face - and in this instance the egg will be human lives.

Let’s remember the Cuban missile crisis where bluff and bluster nearly cost us the world. Someone has to be willing to step back and simply take the slap. 

But I’d hope, as the world, we can do more than turn our cheek. Let's be willing to love our enemy. There is no way back into the global community for the Hermit Kingdom unless someone else opens a door of friendship.  I know there is huge history of hatred and intimidation that would need to be overlooked, but if we ever want to see these tensions gone forever, someone must be willing to hold out an olive branch.

Such discussions cannot take place on the world stage - military dictators must always save face - but I’d hope, behind closed doors world leaders are intelligent enough to realise there is only one way to end this – by shaking hands and making up.